The Stone Man

 

Background:

 

                        ‘I will tell you the story as my mother told it to me, and her mother before that and so on back until it actually happened.  I know that some of the details have been lost, and my memory is not what it was, but I shall tell you all the same.

            ‘A long time ago we of Corn’s Path (Picture 1) served a god, and were happy.  Every 5 years we would give the god our first-born as was his decree, and in return he kept us safe.  Thus had it been for many years, and thus it would have been for many more, but for the stranger.

            He arrived not knowing of the god, and from no-one knows where, but was strong and willing to help us in harvest, so we accepted him and taught him our ways.  He fell in love with one of our women, and they were married the next spring.  All were overjoyed when she fell pregnant with twins, for they would have a child and give one as sacrifice.  But the stranger was not happy.  For he did not believe in the god, and did not want to give up his child.  So he set off from the village to find the god before his children were born.

            He went to the God’s cave (Picture 2), where all knew he lived.  The cave was dark, but the stranger clicked his fingers, and flames lit upon his arm.  He went down the tunnel that he found, and when he feared he would reach hell itself he found the god (Picture 3).

            The god was not pleased to see the stranger, for he was not one of the god’s people and so did not belong.  However he knew that the stranger had married and helped the harvest so was willing to listen to the man.

            “I do not wish to give you my child!” spoke the man, without any introduction.  “You are not my god, and so I will not!”

The god was wise, and thought for a moment before answering the stranger.  “Stranger,” he said, “Do you live in the village in Corn’s Path?”

            “Yes” the stranger replied.

“And do you help gather the harvest with the villagers?”

            “Yes” he replied again.

“I suppose you also eat the food the villagers and you gather and catch?”

            “Yes” he replied for the third time.

“Have you married one of the women of the village, and given her child?”

            “Yes” said the stranger, beginning to see a pattern and fearing where it was leading.

“Well, you will have also enjoyed the peace that I have given by stopping the ghasts from attacking and killing all the children.  The peace that is costly to achieve and only the sacrifice of the first born every 5 years gives me the strength the achieve.  Have you enjoyed that?” asked the god.

            “Yes,” said the stranger, “but I do not believe in the ghasts.  No-one has ever seen them, they have never attacked.  The only peril I have seen is you demanding sacrifice.”

“Then you may keep your child stranger, and so may all the villagers, I will take no more sacrifice.  Since I am not needed I will move on, there are other places that need protecting willing to pay the price.”  With that the god vanished, and the stranger returned to the surface and the village.

            At the village he told what had happened, but said that he had bested the god in a battle of wits, for so it had seemed to him.  There was no rejoicing like he expected and at night the ghasts (Picture 4) came and took all the children for food.  The morning found the god sat in the centre of the village, near a new pedestal.

            “I have protected you using the power of your sacrifice, but this man turned his back on me.  So the ghasts came because I could not hold them back.  I shall leave him here always to show you what will happen if I do not get sacrifice.  When the ghasts are gone for good I shall return him to you.”

            With that the stranger found himself on the pedestal, and the god turned him to stone (Picture 5).  There he stood for many generations, until the statue came to life.”

            And you say you remember none of this?  Perhaps your memory will return if your skin becomes flesh again…’

 

Motive:   Knowledge                                                                 The Stone Man seeks his past life.

Virtue:    Spring – New Growth                                                  The Stone Man is beginning to grow anew.

Fault:       Winter reversed – Inexperience                                    The Stone Man has no memories to draw from until the point he

                                                                                                 awoke.

Fate:       The Eagle – The Mind Prevails vs Thoughtlessness        The stone man seeks to restore his memories, but might it be better

                                                                                                 for him to start again.

 

Fire:     4          Climbing

Earth:   8          Tireless Stride

Water:  2          Sensing Earth Spirits

Air:       3          Loud Voice

 

Powers:

Ageless (0 Points)

            The Stone Man is a living statue, and as such does not age.

 

Stone Skin (3 Points: Frequent, Major & Versatile)

            The Stone Man is made of stone, so it takes a vast force or great heat to damage him.  If damaged he can be repaired by a good

            stonemason.

 

Possessions:

            The Stone Man carries a rusty bronze sword, rags around his waist, and a few pebbles and moss for sustenance.

 

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